Last night a DJ saved my life: What if Twitter could be your own DJ?

While the Twitter music app eventually failed, it’s still clear that people use Twitter’s data stream to share and/or discover new #music. Thanks to Twitter cards, a great thing is that you can directly watch a YouTube video, or listen to a SoundCloud clip, right from your feed, without leaving the platform. But what if Twitter could be your own DJ, playing songs on your request?

Since it’s been a few month since I enjoyed my last Music Hack Day – oh, I definitely miss that! – I’ve hacked a proof of concept using the seevl API, combined with the Twitter and the YouTube ones, to make Twitter acts as your own personal DJ.

Hey @seevl, play something cool

The result is a twitter bot, running under our @seevl handle, which accepts a few (controlled) natural-language queries and replies with an appropriate track, embedded in a Tweet via a YouTube card. Here are a few patterns you can use:

Hey @seevl, play something like A

To play something that is similar to A. For instance, tweet “play something like New Order”, and you might get a reply with a Joy Division track in your feed.

Hey @seevl, play something from L

To play something from an artist signed on label L (or, at least, that used to be on this label at some stage)

Hey @seevl, play some G

To play something from a given genre G

Hey @seevl, play A

To simply play a track from A.

By the way, you can replace “Hey” by anything you want, as long as you politely ask your DJ what you want him to spin. Here’s an example, with my tweet just posted (top of the timeline), and a reply from the bot (bottom left).

Twitter As A DJ
Twitter As A DJ

A little less conversation

As it’s all Twitter-based, not only you can send messages, but you can have a conversation with your virtual DJ. Here’s for instance what I’ve sent first

And got this immediate reply – with the embedded YouTube video

Followed by (“coo” meant to be “cool”)

To immediately listen to Bettie Smith in my stream

It’s kind of fun, I have to say, especially due to the instantaneous nature of the conversation – and it even reminds IRC bots!

Unfortunately, it’s likely that the bot will reach the API rate-limit when posting Tweets (and I’m not handling those errors in the current MVP), so you may not have a reply when you interact with it.

Twitter As A Service?

Besides the music-related hack, I also wanted to showcase the growth of intelligent services on the Web – and how a platform like Twitter can be part of it, using “Twitter As A Service” as a layer for an intelligent Web.

The recently-launched “Buy button” is a simple example of how Twitter can be a Siri-like interface to the world. But why not bringing more intelligence into Twitter. What about “Hey @uber, pick me in 10 minutes”, and using the Tweet geolocation plus a Uber-API integration integration to directly pick – and bill – whoever #requested a black car? Or “Please @opentable, I’d love to have sushis tonight”, and get a reply with links to the top-rated places nearby, with in-tweet booking capability (via the previous buy button)? The data is there, the tools and APIs are there, so…

Yes, this sound a bit like what’s described in the seminal Semantic Web article by Tim Berners-Lee, James Hendler and Ora Lassila. Maybe it’s because we’re finally there, in an age where computers can be those social machines that we’re dreaming about!

 

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